PLAYING DETROIT: TIM SCHUMACK: “I SEE CLEAR SKIES” EP

 

 

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Tim Schumack (or as I have him saved in my phone “Tim AngelBaby”) is one of Detroit’s most beloved sweethearts. His debut EP I See Clear Skies is an open window to both the world and a room while flirting with the simplicity of a wall. Tim commits to selflessly encouraging the listener to shed their skin and grow a tougher layer in its place by revealing his own tenderly crafted balancing act of struggle and triumph through the voice of someone who is still figuring it out. Complete with smokey vocals, pop purist vigor and lyrics that erupt with romantic-comedy-movie-trailer vibes,  I See Clear Skies is a saccharine second chance that is egoless and plush with friendship.

AF: I remember the first night I met you. I was new to the city and you were this magnetic energy.
TS: We met on the dance floor of Haute To Death. We kept on my making eye contact. At the very end of the night I ran across the street and we exchanged names.  Our friendship became concrete when we our paths met again at H2D and we sang the lead ad libs to Madonna’s “ Like A Prayer”

AF: I feel like Detroit perceives you as a shiny person, if that makes sense. You exude something very prismatic. How does “I see Clear Skies” encapsulate your personal philosophy?
TS:  The songs were all written during different times of a season in my life where I was questioning everything; my job, pursuit of dreams, and a ongoing relationship. For me, “I See Clear Skies” became the umbrella for the songs because despite the depths of uncertainty, I choose to believe there is always hope. Does’t mean that I automatically feel better and my circumstances magically change, but I’m choosing to believe there is something more than the present chaos.

AF: What was the dominate challenge in making your first EP?
TF:First, transportation. I started recording the Ep in 2014, out at my friend’s house in Rochester, MI. During the early process of the recordings, I was driving a 2001 Mercury Villager and it died the first summer. I even Uber-ed out there once for a roundtrip of $100. My roommate at the time and a few gracious friends would shuttle me out there. Secondly, taking the raw demos and attempting to maintain the original passion into fresh new recordings. Understanding that I had changed, but wanting to remember the authentic root emotions of why I had even written the music.

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AF: How long have you been writing music? What pushed you to finally record?

TS: I started writing music pretty young. I would buy soundtracks to movies without actually seeing them and I would tinker and made countless instrumentals. I didn’t start song writing until 10th grade. For I See Clear Skies, what pushed me to record was the fact that I had this small body work, wanted to take it to a new height as well as have a foundation to direct people towards.

AF: There’s no doubt that while listening to “I See Clear Skies” it’s easy to get swept up in the juxtaposition of painful truths with a light and curious buoyancy. In one sentence, capture how you want your music to effect people?
TS:  I want listeners to know that feelings experienced in low moments are entirely valid because life is a not one happy monotone line and to give people a sense of calm.

AF: You sing, you dance, you’re a muse to many. These are things that most of our city know about you. What’s something we might not know?
TS: I’m a history nerd. World War ll is one of my favorite things to delve into. There were so many things happening in the world at that time; political climate, attitudes on war, eery parallels to current events.

AF: Where does Detroit fit into your music?
TS: 
Simply, Detroit is home. The city is my template for creativity, resilience, passion, and constant exploration of self. It keeps me honest.

 

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