Joness Discusses Upcoming Debut P.O.L.R.

Joness / P.O.L.R.

Cincinnati’s Joness is gearing up to release her debut studio album, P.O.L.R. The record’s title stands for Path Of Least Resistance and is expected out this fall.

“It’s really touching on the idea of polarity,” the Cincy-based singer/rapper tells Audiofemme. “There’s the saying that opposites attract, and when you think of magnets, something on the south pole is attracted to something on the north pole, which means that each of those ends has something that the other needs.”

Like the invisible draw between magnets, Joness says her album is about embracing life’s own guiding forces, instead of relying on her predisposition toward calculated decision-making.

“Over the past couple of years, I have been going through some things, personally, where I’ve been very resistant to change and the things that are calling me,” she continues. “This album is me [saying], let’s try something different. Let’s try to just let things flow and see what I become attracted to and what gravitates toward me. It touches on love lost, newfound love gained, and various areas of growth that I have seen, and me adopting this new way of existing.”

While she plots P.O.L.R.’s forthcoming rollout, Joness plans to drop new music consistently throughout the next few months. Most recently, she delivered her single “Play.”

P.O.L.R. will follow Joness’ six-track Sheep EP, which she dropped last year. Song-by-song, the project mimicked the stages of intoxication, amounting to a powerful story about the throes of addiction.

“At that time, I was pretty deep in my addiction,” Joness says of recording Sheep. “So that started off as one thing and ended up as a form of therapy; I kind of needed to put that out there.”

While Sheep found Joness in the midst of the struggles she rapped about, P.O.L.R. offers an opportunity for her to reflect on her own – and others’ – experiences.  So far, P.O.L.R. is set to feature production from Internet Boy, Devin Burgess, and more, and will find the artist flexing her vocal range, as well as delivering skillful raps.

“All of my music is therapeutic; it’s one of my favorite forms of release,” she says of Sheep and P.O.L.R. “But I think the magnitude that Sheep held within me is not as heavy [as P.O.L.R.]. With P.O.L.R., I can take the hindsight view… There’s still some songs on there where I’m kinda still working on this, kinda still healing through that, but for the most part, I’ve already come out of it.”