NEWS ROUNDUP: Politics & PJ Harvey

  • Listen to PJ Harvey’s “Guilty”

    “Guilty” was recorded at the same time as Harvey’s latest album, The Hope Six Demolition Project. It’s a political shuffle that tackles subject as a corrupt judicial system and drones. Check it out:

  • Let’s Get Political

    Breaking news: The world sucks, guys. Here’s a brief roundup of musical responses to the tragedies of the past few weeks:

    My Morning Jacket: “Magic Bullet” – The lightly funky song was posted on Soundcloud on Monday with a long message condemning gun violence, which reads in part: “It does not matter your race/creed/sexual orientation we are all filled with the same beautiful blood- a mix of old and new generations… past present and future…we are all in there somewhere…in the blood lines together…all of humanity.”

    https://soundcloud.com/my-morning-jacket/magicbullet

    “23 Ways To Die” – Alicia Keys organized celebrities and artists such as Beyoncé, Chance The Rapper, Rihanna, Common, Chris Rock and Taraji P. Henson for “23 Ways You Could Be Killed If You Are Black In America.” The video, which premiered on Mic.com, opens with a sparse piano track. The powerful video shows clips of those mentioned before, and others, stating the reasons Black people have been killed by police in America; simple things like wearing a hoody, failing to signal a lane change, and walking towards or away from the police.  Watch it here.

    Wahsa: “Justice” – The experimental Brooklyn band shared the song “Justice” on Facebook Sunday, with the following message: “A year ago, Max Mellman approached several artists and I in support of the Baltimore riots to compose songs around field recordings taken during the protests. Although the songs were never released, I feel now is a more relevant time than ever to share in support of those whose lives have been lost. My thoughts and prayers are with you.” The ambient track features the sounds of chanting in the background, and becomes suddenly intense at the end as the voices chant “justice.”